An American Abroad

The Deep Blue Goodbye

I’ve been back in America for three weeks and I regularly run into friends who read this blog. Many of them mention how struck they have been with my pictures of Chefchaouen. I get that. It’s an adhesive place, one seen as an after-image long after the brief exposure to it has occurred.

It seemed appropriate, then, to caption my last Chefchaouen post after the title of a Travis McGee book by the late great John D. MacDonald. In that story, the “deep blue goodbye” was something permanent and fatal. I hope my reluctant departure from this town will be neither

DSC02332e1

DSC02548e

It’s a town where one can find the unexpected animal. . .

DSC02409e

DSC02448e

. . . the charming detail . . .

DSC02566e

DSC02563e

DSC02402e

. . . the commercial . . .

DSC02434e

DSC02432e

. . . and the meditative.

DSC02535e

DSC02527e

DSC02404e

I was curious about how the Chefchaouen shade of blue is achieved. Apparently it’s purchased as a powder, which is then mixed with water and scrubbed into the sides of the stucco and rock walls of the houses. During our stay, we saw many people doing just that.

DSC02398e

This outdoor stairway has been frequently photographed; it showed up in nearly every guidebook I consulted.

DSC02347e

DSC02345e

This fixer-upper was one of my favorite spots. The textures and colors of the ruins were incredible.

DSC02426e

DSC02429e

The rest, remainder and residue of these photos are corners of town that caught my eye. Maybe they’ll catch yours, too.

DSC02554e

DSC02553e

DSC02543e

DSC02540e

DSC02530e

DSC02508e

DSC02469e

DSC02461e

DSC02424e3

DSC02417e

DSC02401e

DSC02399e

DSC02324e

DSC02323e

Speak Your Mind

*